A Spartan Life

An aggregation of things I read or find interesting

I am not going to lie to you, though. The trade was hard for me at first. This is where my heart was, where I wanted to be, where I lived out a story of redemption and felt that every one of you shared it with me in some form or fashion. I loved pitching for you. I loved your passion, the way you embraced me from the start, and the way you seemed to appreciate the effort I was putting forth. Every time I’d walk off the mound after an outing, I’d look in your faces, the people behind the dugout, and felt as if all your energy and support was pouring right into me — even when I was lousy. It gives me chill bumps thinking about it even now.

—R.A. Dickey, in a most remarkable (for a professional athlete) farewell to the fans of his now  former team (via newspeedwayboogie)

(Source: , via newspeedwayboogie)

12 Enjoyable Names for Relatively Common Things

I especially like badinage and grawlix

nevver:

  1. box tent : the plastic table-like item found in pizza boxes
  2. jamais vu : that feeling of seeing something for the first time, even though there’s nothing new about it
  3. paresthesia : that tingling sensation when your foot falls asleep
  4. grawlix : the string of typographical symbols comic strips use to indicate profanity (“$%@!”)
  5. caruncula : the small, triangular pink bump on the inside corner of each eye
  6. badinage : another word for playful banter
  7. rhumba : a group of rattlesnakes
  8. dringle : to waste time by being lazy
  9. agraffe : the wire cage that keeps the cork in a bottle of champagne
  10. wings : those back flaps on a bra
  11. rasher : a single slice of bacon
  12. purlicue : the web between your thumb and forefinger

more

newspeedwayboogie:

John Lennon - Instant Karma 

RIP John Lennon. I was thinking this morning, one of the really tragic things about the loss of John Lennon was that we, New York, couldn’t protect or save him.If you think about it, John Lennon, the Beatle, maybe the greatest musician ever, the school boy from Liverpool, adopted NYC as his home. He and Yoko were around, about, on the streets. They had become NYers. And we embraced them. Coming on the 1970s bankruptcy and problems, what a joy. So tragic, we couldn’t protect him.

shared from exfm

thenewenlightenmentage:

5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse
The universe we live in may not be the only one out there. In fact, our universe could be just one of an infinite number of universes making up a “multiverse.”
Though the concept may stretch credulity, there’s good physics behind it. And there’s not just one way to get to a multiverse — numerous physics theories independently point to such a conclusion. In fact, some experts think the existence of hidden universes is more likely than not.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse

The universe we live in may not be the only one out there. In fact, our universe could be just one of an infinite number of universes making up a “multiverse.”

Though the concept may stretch credulity, there’s good physics behind it. And there’s not just one way to get to a multiverse — numerous physics theories independently point to such a conclusion. In fact, some experts think the existence of hidden universes is more likely than not.

Continue Reading

(via thephilter)

It pays off in your life when you’re in an elevator and people are uncomfortable. You can just say, “That’s a beautiful scarf.” It’s just thinking about making someone else feel comfortable. You don’t worry about yourself, because we’re vibrating together. If I can make yours just a little bit groovier, it’ll affect me. It comes back, somehow.

If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.

Hoarding is bad

J.R.R. Tolkien (via bijan)

(via newspeedwayboogie)

WillWorkFor is a collaboration between IDEO and Collaborative Fund.

collaborativefund:

Throughout our research as a fund, we’ve noticed a trend. The way people sustain themselves is shifting. As the middle class shrinks, one income stream is no longer enough to support a family. In fact, companies’ lifespans are shortening, and stable, full-time positions are in short supply. People today take jobs for 3-5 years before their positions change or become obsolete.

Out of this potentially alarming trend, people have emerged self-reliant. Some to survive and others by choice. Individuals and communities are asking meaningful questions about whom they will work for, where to spend money and where to spend their time. From artisanal experiments to wild daydreams to viable new business models, passion has come to the foreground of our professional lives.

Collaborative Fund partnered with IDEO on WillWorkFor out of a natural conversation. We found an alignment in our goals and values.

In venture capital, it used to be enough to see a profitable short-term opportunity and invest, no matter the underlying societal harm in the long term. In business design, talented people would race to manufacture the bestselling good. But things are changing, and people want better.

We invest in companies whose profits are tied to their positive social impact, and IDEO has moved beyond game changing products like the mouse to tackling entrenched design problems, like school systems and big banks. We are both betting on a future we can sustain.

Will Work For is a design provocation intended to spark a reaction and fuel a conversation. What role does our passion play today in our food, education, and communication? And what if our passion could play an even bigger role in daily life and whole systems of exchange?

We see a chance to remake global institutions as platforms for mentoring, stewardship, and apprenticeship. We see the future in farming and data analytics, in digital prototypes and new energy, in family networks and in education.

We see the future in communities that create and support creation. We see the future in the passions of people just like you. That is how this project came to life — a vision of an alternate present and the inevitable future of work.

-Karyn Campbell, Investor

(Source: collaborativefund, via kanyi)